News

  • The NLRB Is Finally Getting Some Teeth

    by Brandon Magner | Labor Law Lite


    It’s been a good eight days or so for those who wish to see the National Labor Relations Board enforce federal labor law as written:

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  • Critical Piece of PRO Act Included in Senate Democrats’ Budget Reconciliation Bill

    An essential piece of the PRO Act, which would create monetary penalties for companies that violate workers’ union rights, appears to have been included in the Senate Democrats' current budget reconciliation bill.

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  • How to Start a Union the Right Way

    So you and some of your coworkers have talked about how to organize a union to improve your working conditions. That is a bright idea, given that the typical union worker makes 19.4% more than a non-union worker, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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  • How to File an Unfair Labor Practice Charge

    The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) and Federal Service Labor Management Relations Statute protect the rights of workers in interactions between employees, unions, and employers. Most importantly, these laws safeguard employees from undue influence or unfair treatment by an employer. Knowing these rights will help you recognize when to contact a lawyer that knows how to file an Unfair Labor Practice charge.

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  • Forming a Labor Union: Understand Your Rights

    Unions give workers more power concerning important workplace matters such as pay, working conditions, and benefits. However, many workers do not fully understand their rights when it comes to forming and joining a labor union.

    In this post, we’ll quickly give workers what they need to know about forming a union and how they can learn more about their rights.

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  • The PRO Act Would Protect Workers and Pay For Itself

    by Brandon Magner | Labor Law Lite


    It has been common wisdom since the 1960s that the National Labor Relations Board is a structurally deficient agency. It has a broad statutory mission to protect workers’ rights by encouraging the spread of collective bargaining across American industry, but it has little means of enforcing its mandate. The text of the National Labor Relations Act was immediately interpreted narrowly by the Supreme Court to not provide for any punitive fines, so our labor law is only remedial in nature. Employers learned to exploit this loophole, and as unions became smaller and weaker, there was less economic, social, and political blowback for employers who flagrantly violated the NLRA. It even became good business, as an entire cottage industry of expert union-avoidance consultants and law firms sprung up in the latter twentieth century to teach companies how to break the law without consequence.

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  • POLL: 65% of Workers Under 40 Don't Know About Their Right to Form a Union

    A LaborLab/Centiment poll conducted between April 7 - 10 2021 found that 65% of workers under the age of forty are unfamiliar with their right to unionize.

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  • Can I Form A Union At My Workplace?

    Sixty years ago, close to one third of workers in the United States belonged to unions, but a steady decline has left only one in ten workers with union representation. This is one of the reasons that so many workers in the United States aren’t earning a living wage, have poor working conditions and get few benefits.

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  • What it means to unionize

    Do you believe you deserve to be treated with respect and dignity in the workplace? Do you think you should have a voice about the decisions that impact your job, pay, and benefits? Do you want to make a positive impact in your community? If you answered "yes" to any or all of these questions, then you should keep reading.

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  • Your right to unionize is protected by the U.S. Constitution

    The right to unionize your workplace isn't just protected by the National Labor Relations Act -- it's protected by the U.S. Constitution.

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